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Diversity Center of Excellence of the Cornell Center for Health Equity Receives U.S. Department of HHS Training Grant

Dr. Susana Morales

The Diversity Center of Excellence of the Cornell Center for Health Equity has received a $150,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This grant will serve to expand health professions workforce training with a focus on telehealth and distance learning capabilities in response to COVID-19.

Dr. Susana Morales, Director and PI, Diversity Center of Excellence of the Cornell Center for Health Equity, explains that the grant will be used for curriculum development of COVID-19 clinical training (including distance learning) with a focus on telehealth, health disparities, and equity issues related to COVID-19. It will also help to further faculty and student research training on COVID-19 in minority and underserved populations with an eye on treatment and prevention.

This $150,000 grant from the HHS was delivered via the Health Resources and Services Administration as part of a $15 million award given to 159 organizations across five health workforce programs. The grants are funded through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act signed into law on Friday, March 27, 2020. HRSA made awards to organizations based on their capacity to implement COVID-19 telehealth activities that train professionals across the health care team. This will enable health professionals to maximize telehealth for COVID-19 referrals for screening and testing, case management, outpatient care, and other essential care during the crisis. Additionally, through increased telehealth capabilities from this funding, organizations will be able to maintain primary care services when clinics and medical facilities are not available, especially for COVID-19 positive, quarantined, elderly, and other vulnerable populations.